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Archive for the ‘Today in Classical Music History…’ Category

On June 13, 1748, George Frideric completed the score of Solomon. This oratorio, in three acts, is unique since each one depicts a fresco. The first act deals with the Dedication of the Temple and Solomon’s happy marriage with the pharaoh’s daughter. The second act, with the two harlots disputing about the parentage of the baby and the judgement from Solomon. And the third with the visit of Queen Sheba and the expression of different emotions in music. According to Handel scholar, Winton Dean, the composer conceived the work as an example of an ideal society and, consequently, as a tribute to british society and King George II.

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Let’s hear some orchestral pieces, at first.

Solomon: Overture (Andante-allegro moderato)

Solomon: Act III: Arrival of the Queen of Sheba

For more information

Atma Classique

Amazon.com

Online reviews

Classics Today

MusicWeb

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From the excellent 1984 Gardiner recording, let’s give a look to the “May no rash intruder” chorus, from the Act I, where Handel depicts the nightingales with nice strings effects.

Solomon: Act I: Chorus “May no rash intruder”

Lyrics

May no rash intruder disturb their soft hours;
To form fragrant pillows, arise, oh ye flow’rs!
Ye zephirs, soft-breathing, their slumbers prolong,
While nightingales lull them to sleep with their song.

Credits

John Eliot Gardiner/English Baroque Soloists and Monteverdi Choir/Philips

For more information

Amazon.com

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We could not end this post without the rousing last chorus from the great Reuss/Akademie fur Alte Musik Berlin/RIAS Kammerchor recording on Harmonia Mundi.

Solomon: Act III: Chorus “Praise the Lord”

Lyrics

Chorus 1
Praise the Lord with harp and tongue!
Praise Him all ye old and young,
He’s in mercy ever strong.

Chorus 2
Praise the Lord through ev’ry state,
Praise Him early, praise Him late,
God alone is good and great.

Full Chorus
Let the loud Hosannahs rise,
Widely spreading through the skies,
God alone is just and wise.

For more information

Harmonia Mundi

Amazon.com

Online reviews

Classics Today

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Sources for this post

Libretto List

Winton Dean, “Solomon, an oratorio of pageantry and pomp”, notes from the Gardiner/Philips CD.

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On June 9, 1763, Leopold Mozart, deputy Kapellmeister of the Prince-Archbishop of Salzburg, left the town with his son Wolfgang on an european tour who will end in 1766. The trip will lead the father and the son to Munich, Mannheim, The Hague, Paris and London. It is in Britain, in 1764, that the 8 years old boy will compose his first symphony, from which we will listen the first movement (molto allegro). The symphony is written for an orchestra of two horns, two oboes and strings.

The Mozart family on tour by Carmontelle, ca. 1763

Sources for this post

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Symphony_No._1_%28Mozart%29

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wolfgang_Amadeus_Mozart

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On June 6 1757, Ignaz Joseph Pleyel (1757-1831) was born in Ruppersthal, near Vienna. He is famous to have been a Joseph Haydn‘s pupil during the 1770’s but also for his music publisher and piano manufacturer career in Paris.

During the 1780’s and 1790’s he was known as a gifted composer. He created many symphonies and quartets.  For his birthday, let’s listen to an excerpt of his Symphonie Concertante in B flat major, B. 112 (Rondo moderato) from 1791. Please note that the work is intended for violin and alto instead of the clarinets you will hear in that sample.

If the Youtube video doesn’t appear, keep refreshing the page, you should see it.

Sebastian Tewinkel conductor
Südwestdeutsches Kammerorchester Pforzheim
Dieter Klöcker and Sandra Arnold, clarinets

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