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Archive for the ‘Chamber Music’ Category

Parisian Quartets

We are still on Luigi Boccherini. This time, let’s give a quick look to his chamber music. First, an excerpt from the “Musica Notturna di Madrid” Quintet (1780), which was heard in the Master and Commander movie. Then, two movements from the Guitar Quintet no 1 op. 57, published in 1799 in Paris.

Le Concert des nations / Jordi Savall / Alia Vox

Quintet in C major: Passa calle (allegro vivo)

For more information

Alia Vox

Amazon.com

Online reviews

Classics Today

All Music Guide

La Magnifica Communità / Eros Roselli, guitar / Brilliant Classics

Quintet no 1 in D minor: Minuetto

Quintet no 1 in D minor: Allegro assai

For more information

Amazon.com

Online review

All Music Guide

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Another hidden gem. This time, I rather explore with you an unknown work from a famous composer: The Paris Quartets by Georg Philipp Telemann (1681-1767).

Actually, the name was falsely attributed since they were not edited in Paris or intended for this market at first (The edition name was Quadri a Violino, Flauto traversiere, Viola di gamba o Violoncello, e Fondamento […], not very french). However, they quickly reached Paris and became very popular there. In 1737, Telemann went in the french capital for a 8 months trip and published there a new series of quartets, usually refered to the Paris Quartets no 7 to 12.

For this entry, I will offer you a few samples of a nice CD including the (false) Paris Quartets (nos 1 to 6) played by the Freiburger BarockConsort, on Harmonia Mundi label. Really lovely little jewels.

Concerto Primo in G major: Grave-allegro

Concerto Primo in G major: Allegro

Sonata Prima in A major: Soave

For more information

Harmonia Mundi

Amazon.com

Sources for this post

Andreas Friesenhagen, notes from the Quatuors Parisiens CD

Wikipedia


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Some Extra Biber

Well, I bought today Biber’s “8 Sonatae a Violino Solo”, published in 1681. I thought it would justified to post some samples since the production value of that double CD (Harmonia Mundi) is terrific.

I took the samples from the Sonata no II (which is actually one movement in all) and from the Sonata Representativa (program music composed around 1669). The performers, Andrew Maze, Nigel North and John Toll are excellent. Still, not all like Manze playing. Judge by yourself.

Sonata II: Variatio – Finale

Sonata Representativa: The Frog

Sonata Representativa: The Cock and Hen

Sonata Representativa: The Cat (meow!)

Sonata Representativa: The Musketeer’s March (well a fast march!)

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For more information

Harmonia Mundi

Amazon.com

Online reviews

BBC

Classics Today

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Friday. It means it is the time for the hidden gem of the week.

For the first entry of that thematic series, I had in mind to put on spotlight Heinrich Ignaz Franz Biber (1644-1704). Born in Bohemia, he worked

at the court of the Prince-Archbishop of Salzburg (the same employer of Leopold and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and Michael Haydn) from 1670 to his death. He became Kapellmeister in 1684 and was knighted by the Emperor Leopold I in 1690 (his name changed then for Heinrich Ignaz Franz Biber von Bibern). He is known for his contributions to the violin technique and the art of scordatura (mis-tuning of strings).

A great example of scordatura is the Mystery Sonatas set, created around 1676 (but not all were composed at the same time).  The mysteries, or mediations on the life of the Christ and the Virgin Mary are divided into three cycles of five (joyful, sorrowful, glorious). I selected the sonata no 11: The Resurrection, which is part of the “glorious” cycle, is the greatest example of scordatura in the  sonatas series.

http://www.box.net/shared/i1qanorvun

WalterReiter, violin/Ensemble Cordaria/Brilliant Classics

(The CD was first released on SIGNUM CD).

For more Information

Amazon.com

Reviews

http://www.signumrecords.com/catalogue/sigcd021/reviews.htm

I selected too a sample from Biber’s requiem in F Minor, composed around 1692 in Salzburg. Youtube offers a good performance of the Sequence part of the Requiem. The latin text with its english translation is available on Wikipedia:

Paul McCreesh/Gabrieli Consort and Players/Archiv

Sources for this post

http://www.aam.co.uk/features/biberm.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heinrich_Ignaz_Biber

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dies_Irae

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